Pass-Throughs and Surcharges: What You Need to Know

City of Beverly Hills allows the landlord to pass-through to tenants certain costs of doing business such as refuse collection and alley maintenance. And if the city hits the landlord with a penalty using too much water then the landlord can pass along 90% of that expense too. Longtime tenants may also pay for the landlord’s new roof, a paint job and even seismic retrofit because those capital expenses can be passed-through. Let us explain!

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County Moratorium Continues No-Fault Eviction Protection (Except for Landlord Use)

Beverly Hills rent-stabilized households lost an important eviction protection when the moratorium expired: starting June 1st a tenancy could be terminated for redevelopment, remodeling, condo conversion, or any reason enumerated in the Beverly Hills rent stabilization ordinance. Households that rent a single-family home or condominium in Beverly Hills have it worse: they can be evicted for any reason or no reason at all with only 60 days notice. These households generally have no protection under local or state law. However the Los Angeles County moratorium does put such no-fault evictions on hold through December of 2022 although with one caveat: landlords can still move-in a relative. Let’s take a closer look at the county moratorium protection.

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How Much Can My Landlord Bill Me for Trash Pickup? [Updated]

City of Beverly Hills allows residential multifamily landlords to pass through to tenants the bimonthly cost of refuse collection and alley maintenance charged by the city. As of fiscal year 2022-23 those costs can add $40.36 to the monthly rent if passed-through by the landlord. And the landlord can pass it through unless the rental agreement explicitly says that the landlord will pay for refuse. While some tenants already pay for refuse, many more will be surprised to learn that an unexpected $40 can be added to the rent for a basic service like trash collection that should come with the housing.

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Ellis Act Evictions: Senior and Disabled Occupants Get More Time

Localities in California are allowed to regulate the price of rental housing and even to impose restrictive conditions on evictions. However a locality cannot force a residential rental property owner to stay in the apartment leasing business. The state’s Ellis Act allows the landlord to exit the business by evicting all tenants for redevelopment or some other purpose with only 120 days notice. Senior and disabled tenants can stay in their home for up to a full year. That additional time is useful for finding replacement housing and it provides additional leverage if the household negotiates a cash buyout. Here is what you need to know.

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Electric Vehicle Chargers Upon Request: What You Need to Know

Electric vehicles have found a strong market in high-income Beverly Hills because state and federal rebates have taken some of the shock out of the sticker price and incentives exist for single-family EV home chargers. What about multifamily? More than half of Beverly Hills households have no access to at-home vehicle charging. To address it Sacramento enacted a law to require landlords to install an EV charger upon request but the law is not helping EV owners. Here’s what you need to know.

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When Can the Landlord Enter My Unit?

Landlords can enter a rented dwelling only for limited reasons, according to state law, such as to tend to an emergency, to make agreed-upon repairs or to perform certain health and safety inspections. The law also allows entry in order to exhibit the unit to a prospective buyer or a prospective tenant — even while the current tenant still resides there. While the reasons for entry is narrow, we still see that landlords request entry for a general inspection or some other purpose that not allowed by law. Here is what you need to know about lawful entry.

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If Gas-Powered Blowers are Banned, Why Are They Still Around?

The California Air Resources Board has finally clamped down on gasoline-powered leaf blowers by banning the sale of new machines starting in 2024. It is about time! This scourge of urban living has gotten a free pass from regulators for far too long. Localities have been banning them for years — Beverly Hills outlawed them in 1978 — yet these portable, point-source pollution emitters remain an everyday nuisance for residents everywhere.

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How to File a Code Enforcement Complaint

Code enforcement is compliant-driven in Beverly Hills. Unfortunately the city has no systematic rental housing inspection program, so City Hall relies on the public to report violations. Lax code enforcement has enabled some landlords to practice ‘managed decline’ where money that should go to maintenance is taken as profit. Renters Alliance encourages tenants to file a complaint because that is how we hold landlords accountable. Heck, landlords agree because they don’t want regular inspections. Here is our step-by-step guide to filing a complaint.

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How to Register for Beverly Hills e-Notices

Beverly Hills provides a service called ‘E-notice’ that will send city notices by email. The link to the subscription service is in the footer of the city website. Click though and you’re greeted with a blank login screen (above). There is no information about the service or why it is useful. Registration is at least a three-step process. But it’s worth it to receive rent stabilization division announcements and Rent Stabilization Commission agendas. We walk you through the sign-up process.

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What Type of Construction Requires a City Permit?

Beverly Hills regulates interior and exterior construction through building permits. The process ensures that work will comply with state and local building codes. But permits also protect multifamily occupants from construction conditions that could compromise public safety and to some extent shield tenants from impacts that negatively affect habitability. However too much work occurs without the required permits. We should know which type of construction requires a permit and what to do if the work is not properly permitted.

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Cash-for-Keys Buyouts: What You Need to Know

You have been approached by the landlord with a cash offer to vacate your apartment. It is called a buyout. Should you take it? Is it a fair offer? Do you have leverage to negotiate a better offer? We urge you to know your rights before you take the cash. A rent-stabilized tenancy in Beverly Hills is worth more than you think. So let’s talk about the buyout and your options when the landlord comes calling with cash in hand.

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